An Ancient Japanese Technique To Produce Timber Without Cutting Trees 

In Asia, Japan is one of the most beautiful countries. Not only beauty, but it also holds so many cool things, interesting methods and ways that they do things and even lives. These things do not stop amazing people.


Most of us know the Japanese technique of creating small versions of big trees and plants. That is Bonsai. That method was founded by Japanese people around thousand years ago. But, there’s another Japanese method called daisugi that is not really famous among people. Wrath Of Gnon

Daisugi is same as bonsai but the end results are polar opposites. This technique was invented in the 14th century. Because it’s not known to many people, the Twitter post uploaded by Wrath of Gnon about this method got shared vigorously. Even on other platforms like Reddit and Imgur.Wrath Of Gnon

Wrath Of Gnon

This technique, daisugi, is performed using uniquely made cedar trees, to be specific, Japanese white cedar, are pruned to make many shoots. These shoots can grow up to hundreds of meters of pin-straight trees which can produce lumber as double as a normal tree. The overall process can cost up to 20 years.

Wrath Of Gnon

With the time, around the 16th century, when demand for tree wood went down, this technique was used to create ornamental trees to decorate gardens. Wrath Of GnonThis method was originally invented by people living in the Kitayama region in Japan to overcome the seedling shortages. When centuries passed by, this method went forgotten, leaving several hundred years old daisugi plants deep in the forests around Japan.Wrath Of Gnon But, now after the post of Wrath of Gnon, people have shown interest in this and hopefully, this technique will come alive again putting a full stop on deforestation.

Wrath Of Gnon

Wrath Of Gnon

Wrath Of Gnon

Image credits: wrathofgnon


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